December 7, 2017

SALESFORCE NEWS: Welcome 28 New Salesforce MVPs!


SEP 18, 2017 BY HOLLY FIRESTONE

We’re excited to welcome 28 new Salesforce MVPs and welcome back 102 re-awarded MVPs to the MVP Ohana today! We’re also thrilled to announce 10 new inductees into the MVP Hall of Fame.
The Salesforce MVP program honors and awards those making exceptional contributions to the Salesforce Community. Salesforce MVPs are true trailblazers who dedicate their time and energy to forge a path for future learners to succeed. They bring the spirit of Ohana to life by inspiring others to learn Salesforce and connect to our thriving community.

We receive hundreds of community nominations for new MVPs during twice yearly nomination periods, so achieving this award is not an easy feat. It takes true dedication to helping others – through online answers and collaboration, leading Community Groups, blogging, sharing expertise through presentations, and countless other contributions that consistently surprise and delight our Ohana. 
We are thrilled to introduce you to the newest class of MVPs and the returning MVPs. Say hello, and congratulations! Follow them online, connect at your local Community Groups, and meet them at countless events around the world!

New Salesforce MVPs

Receiving their 1st MVP recognition

Amit Chaudhary Guillermo Pedroni
Terry Cole Bill Powell
Laura Diaz Samantha Safin
Stuart Edeal Monica Sandberg
Ines Garcia Pritam Shekhawat
Megan Himan Abhilasha Singh
Joanna Iturbe Carlos Siqueira
Misty Jones Corey Snow
Michael Kolodner Adam Spriggs
David Litton Sadahiro Suzuki
Sue Maass Christian Szandor Knapp
Kim McClure Mary Tagler
Junko Nakayama Colleen Whelan
Amy Oplinger Alba Azcona Rivas

Returning Salesforce MVPs

MVPs awarded again! You can find all of our current MVPs on Twitter here.
Abhinav Gupta Jesse Altman
Adam Olshansky Jitendra Zaa
Adam Kramer Jodie Miners
Adam Marks Johan Yu
Aiden Martin Jonathan Baltz
Alex Sutherland Joni Martin
Amber Boaz Justin Edelstein
Andrew Fawcett Kalman Sweetwine
Andy Ognenoff Karen Fitton
Angela Mahoney Kartik Viswanadha
Anup Jadhav Katie McFadden
Ashima Saigal Kelly Bentubo
Beth Breisnes Kerry McClauss (McDonough)
Bill Greenhaw Kevin O’Hara
Blakely Graham Kylee Durant
Brad Struss Kyla Longe
Brent Downey Lars Nielsen
Bryan Boroughf Launa Saunders
Calvin Smith Lori Witzel
Carolina Ruiz Medina Luke Cushanick
Cheryl Feldman Maria Belli
Chris Zullo Mark Ross
Christine Pechter Martijn Schwarzer
Clara Perez Matthew Morris
Dale Ziegler Mayank Srivastava
Dan Appleman Michael Slawnik
Daniel Ballinger Nana Gregg
Daniel Peter Nicholas Zinser
David Cheng Nik Panter
David Giller Patrick Connelly
Deepa Patel Paul Battisson
Don Robins Peter Churchill
Douglas Ayers Peter Knolle
Edward Schlicksup Phil Weinmeister
Elena Inurrategui Rachel Rogers
Elizabeth Davidson Rakesh Kumar
Eric Dreshfield Rebecca Lammers
Eric Wu Ryan Headley
Gaurav Kheterpal Ryan Ozimek
Geoff Flynn Sharif Shaalan
Geraldine Gray Sharon Klardie
Gorav Seth Shinichi Tomita
Jackie Travieso Shivanath Devinarayanan
James Loghry Shonnah Hughes
Jarrod Kingston Simon Lawrence
Jason Atwood Susan Thayer
Jean-Luc Antoine Taiki Yoshikawa
Jean-Michel Mougeolle Takahiro Yonei
Jeff May Thomas Taylor
Jen Nelson Vamsi Krishna
Jennifer Lee Vinay Chaturvedi


New Inductees to the MVP Hall of Fame

The Salesforce MVP Hall of Fame is an emeritus status that recognizes the exceptional individuals that have been awarded Salesforce MVP 5+ times. These MVPs receive this honorary title for life, and can be renominated back into the program in future rounds based on their community activity and contributions at that time.
Andrew Gross Matthew Lamb
David Pier Michael Farrington
Jared Miller Nick Hamm
Jason Paquette Scott Hemmeter
Jason Venable Will Nourse

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November 29, 2017

Report: State should form task force to tackle youth homelessness


By 

AUSTIN (KXAN) – A new report about youth homelessness in Texas highlights a need for comprehensive policies and a funding stream to address the ongoing issue.
Texas Appleseed partnered with Texas Network of Youth Services (TNOYS) and conducted more than 100 interviews with youth who had experienced or are experiencing homelessness in Texas. Both groups also pulled data from state agencies related to youth.
Clair Cole, 19, became homeless when she was 16. “I had a lot of struggles connecting with family especially in that time of my life,” she said. “I was going through a lot. They were going through a lot.”
Cole relied on couch surfing to find places to stay. But as time passed, it became harder. “[I was] feeling like I was a burden, a lot of just trying to sink into the background and just be there without being there,” she said.
She’s now 19, received her GED and has her own small business making jewelry. She also serves as a Lifeworks Youth Ambassador in Austin, raising awareness about what services are available under their provider program.
“I would never want anyone to experience the feeling of not feeling welcome in your own home,” she said.
Lifeworks says each evening it shelters or houses more than 140 youth. There’s also a counseling division for individuals and families who deal with abuse, trauma, anxiety or other stressors.
“If I had known there was an emergency shelter, I would’ve gone straight there,” she said.
The report by Texas Appleseed and TNOYS says each year, at least 1,000 students who have dealt with homelessness repeat a grade and 1,400 drop out. It also says youth in foster care are in high risk of becoming homeless. In 2016, a total of 1,250 youth aged out of foster care on their 18th birthday. In that same year, more than 1,000 children in Texas ran away from a foster care placement.
Gabriella McDonald, the pro bono and new projects director for Texas Appleseed, said schools are on the front lines of this issue, but too often, it’s hard to track.
“Sometimes, schools don’t find out they have youth who [are] experiencing homelessness until they have someone who is about to graduate and it’s time to pay for their cap and gown,” McDonald said.
Both organizations have recommended that Texas form a statewide task force led by the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services and the Department of Housing and Community Affairs. They also want lawmakers to form a dedicated funding source to support prevention and intervention services for at-risk and homeless youth.
“There’s state funding for youth, there’s state funding for homelessness, but there’s not state funding for youth who are homeless,” McDonald said.
Terry Cole runs Street Youth Ministry. The organization holds several relationship-building events, focused around art, guidance counseling and teamwork.
“We meet them where they are,” he said. He said too often youth who face homelessness are stigmatized and viewed differently.

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June 20, 2017

‘Faces of the Transient Lifestyle’


‘Faces of the Transient Lifestyle’
The black-and-white portraits of these street youth — (left to right) “Blue,” “Lauren” and “Otter Pig” — were photographed in Austin between 2014 and 2016 by Michael Joseph, who since 2011 has photographed train riders and hitchhikers he calls “a loosely knit tribe of travelers” living transient lifestyles nationwide.

A series of Joseph’s black-and-white portraits of these travelers — titled “Lost and Found” — is now on view at Daniel Cooney Fine Art in New York City. Street Youth Ministry has served some of these individuals specifically — and lots of them generally. We invite you to learn more about Joseph’s work, using the link below.

Go to the exhibition's web page

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June 20, 2017

Volunteering for SYM yields ‘a strong feeling of family’


Volunteering for SYM yields
 ‘a strong feeling of family’
[EDITOR’S NOTE: in mid-year 2016, we began to urge our donors, volunteers and other partners to share their experiences and give SYM a rating using the Greatnonprofits.org website. To date, there have been 27 entries, among them a gratifying testimony shared by volunteer Rodolfo Aguilar (at right in the photo, with SYM client Jose) and excerpted below. Thank you, Rodolfo!]
Volunteering for Street Youth Ministry of Austin has been a life-changing experience. The way this ministry deals with clients is inspiring, humbling, and motivating. Attending to these clients in a personal level have enriched and fulfilled my life in ways I didn’t expect. I realize I can do more for them, and always find myself looking forward to the next time to be of service.

Witnessing the passion Mr. Terri places in every single relationship he builds with his clients, with genuine dignifying care and respect, and incredible patience, I’ve humbled myself and widened my scope in matters of life in which most people would choose to look the other way. The welcoming ambiance has a strong feeling of family and camaraderie.

Clients spontaneously find a much needed peaceful and safe place that has been set up strategically to reach them at the stage of personal, emotional, and spiritual development they are and scaffold them to higher levels of personal growth without being pushed or coerced.

They start wanting to learn more, seeking and finding that spiritual connection that anchors their sense of being, the realization that their lives are worthy and that they can find ways to achieve their dreams. Possibilities can be in their hands.

Click here for volunteer opportunities

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May 1, 2017

ID’s Legislation in Texas Needs Help


There
are three bills pending for the 2017 Regular Legislative Session in Texas that
relate to Identification for clients of street youth. None seem terribly
objectionable but without support from the public it’s not clear they will be
reported out of committee and move forward.
Identification
has become quite difficult to obtain ever since 9/11 — for good reasons.
However, as a homeless person, it has become increasingly difficult to get
Texas Identification cards from DPS. Our clients often face a very frustrating
period of 3 or 4 months in order to get their ID, only to often turn around and
have it stolen or lost on the streets. They often face extremely frustrating
requirements such as needing ID to get their birth certificate and needing a
birth certificate to get ID. Or similarly, needing an ID to get proof of social
security ID and needing social security ID to get a photo ID. The only portion
of the process that seems easy is, ironically, proof of residency. We are able
to notarize for clients a statement testifying that they are homeless.
One
proposed legislations would make it simpler for every homeless person to obtain
ID. And two other proposed legislations would apply to youth in foster care and
homeless young people through age 21 (or possibly 24).
HB 3354 – Was referred to Homeland
Security and Public Safety Committee about a month ago – it has not gotten a
hearing yet, and if it doesn’t get a hearing in about a week it will be dead.

HB 3561 – Was voted out of committee
two days ago – there was a committee substitute, and this language is not on
the Internet yet, but should be next week.

SB2107 – Referred to Health and Human
Services Committee about a month ago, and has not gotten a hearing yet. The drop-dead
date for Senate bills is a little later than house bills.

Street
Youth Ministry strongly encourages citizens of Texas to support passage of
simpler DPS IDs for homeless and especially homeless youth. If we want our
homeless to get jobs, find housing, apply for benefits, they desperately need
IDs quickly. So much of the work in social justice focuses on attempting to
help homeless navigate the frustrating, changing, and challenging requirements
for DSP issued ID. And these IDs are prerequisite for so many programs and
opportunities that we all want our homeless to avail themselves of. It only
makes sense to take away this barrier for all homeless and especially younger
homeless. Many homeless reports giving up their plans to return to normalcy
after repeatedly experiencing frustrations and setups in obtaining IDs. 
Please
contact your representative to let them know you would like these bills to come
out of committee and be approved this year!

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May 1, 2017

ID’s Legislation in Texas Needs Help


There
are three bills pending for the 2017 Regular Legislative Session in Texas that
relate to Identification for clients of street youth. None seem terribly
objectionable but without support from the public it’s not clear they will be
reported out of committee and move forward.
Identification
has become quite difficult to obtain ever since 9/11 — for good reasons.
However, as a homeless person, it has become increasingly difficult to get
Texas Identification cards from DPS. Our clients often face a very frustrating
period of 3 or 4 months in order to get their ID, only to often turn around and
have it stolen or lost on the streets. They often face extremely frustrating
requirements such as needing ID to get their birth certificate and needing a
birth certificate to get ID. Or similarly, needing an ID to get proof of social
security ID and needing social security ID to get a photo ID. The only portion
of the process that seems easy is, ironically, proof of residency. We are able
to notarize for clients a statement testifying that they are homeless.
One
proposed legislations would make it simpler for every homeless person to obtain
ID. And two other proposed legislations would apply to youth in foster care and
homeless young people through age 21 (or possibly 24).
HB 3354 – Was referred to Homeland
Security and Public Safety Committee about a month ago – it has not gotten a
hearing yet, and if it doesn’t get a hearing in about a week it will be dead.

HB 3561 – Was voted out of committee
two days ago – there was a committee substitute, and this language is not on
the Internet yet, but should be next week.

SB2107 – Referred to Health and Human
Services Committee about a month ago, and has not gotten a hearing yet. The drop-dead
date for Senate bills is a little later than house bills.

Street
Youth Ministry strongly encourages citizens of Texas to support passage of
simpler DPS IDs for homeless and especially homeless youth. If we want our
homeless to get jobs, find housing, apply for benefits, they desperately need
IDs quickly. So much of the work in social justice focuses on attempting to
help homeless navigate the frustrating, changing, and challenging requirements
for DSP issued ID. And these IDs are prerequisite for so many programs and
opportunities that we all want our homeless to avail themselves of. It only
makes sense to take away this barrier for all homeless and especially younger
homeless. Many homeless reports giving up their plans to return to normalcy
after repeatedly experiencing frustrations and setups in obtaining IDs. 
Please
contact your representative to let them know you would like these bills to come
out of committee and be approved this year!

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May 1, 2017

ID’s Legislation in Texas Needs Help


There
are three bills pending for the 2017 Regular Legislative Session in Texas that
relate to Identification for clients of street youth. None seem terribly
objectionable but without support from the public it’s not clear they will be
reported out of committee and move forward.
Identification
has become quite difficult to obtain ever since 9/11 — for good reasons.
However, as a homeless person, it has become increasingly difficult to get
Texas Identification cards from DPS. Our clients often face a very frustrating
period of 3 or 4 months in order to get their ID, only to often turn around and
have it stolen or lost on the streets. They often face extremely frustrating
requirements such as needing ID to get their birth certificate and needing a
birth certificate to get ID. Or similarly, needing an ID to get proof of social
security ID and needing social security ID to get a photo ID. The only portion
of the process that seems easy is, ironically, proof of residency. We are able
to notarize for clients a statement testifying that they are homeless.
One
proposed legislations would make it simpler for every homeless person to obtain
ID. And two other proposed legislations would apply to youth in foster care and
homeless young people through age 21 (or possibly 24).
HB 3354 – Was referred to Homeland
Security and Public Safety Committee about a month ago – it has not gotten a
hearing yet, and if it doesn’t get a hearing in about a week it will be dead.

HB 3561 – Was voted out of committee
two days ago – there was a committee substitute, and this language is not on
the Internet yet, but should be next week.

SB2107 – Referred to Health and Human
Services Committee about a month ago, and has not gotten a hearing yet. The drop-dead
date for Senate bills is a little later than house bills.

Street
Youth Ministry strongly encourages citizens of Texas to support passage of
simpler DPS IDs for homeless and especially homeless youth. If we want our
homeless to get jobs, find housing, apply for benefits, they desperately need
IDs quickly. So much of the work in social justice focuses on attempting to
help homeless navigate the frustrating, changing, and challenging requirements
for DSP issued ID. And these IDs are prerequisite for so many programs and
opportunities that we all want our homeless to avail themselves of. It only
makes sense to take away this barrier for all homeless and especially younger
homeless. Many homeless reports giving up their plans to return to normalcy
after repeatedly experiencing frustrations and setups in obtaining IDs. 
Please
contact your representative to let them know you would like these bills to come
out of committee and be approved this year!

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April 25, 2017

Handling Anxiety as a Young Adult


by Guest Blogger – Noah Smith

anxiety-2019928.jpg
Photo Credit: Wokandapix, Pixabay
Even though anxiety disorders are typically highly treatable and are the most common mental illness in the U.S. (affecting 18 percent of the population), only one-third of sufferers receive treatment. In addition to seeking professional care, there are things you can do as a young adult with anxiety to help get your symptoms under control. Doing so will help you to live a more comfortable and enjoyable life.
Risks of Untreated Anxiety
Anxiety is commonly associated with agitation, insomnia, and the inability to concentrate. It’s also associated with an increased risk of heart disease and respiratory problems, as well as irritable bowel syndrome and other gastrointestinal disorders. Headaches, both tension and migraine, are common in people with anxiety, as are allergies, sleep disturbances, and teeth grinding. Obesity has also been linked to anxiety.
Anxiety causes chronic stress, which can compromise your immune system and make you more susceptible to infections. If left untreated, anxiety can lead to a dual diagnosis with another mental health disorder or a substance use disorder. The negative effects of anxiety disorders can interfere with your life, creating issues at work, school, and in relationships. As you age, you have even more responsibilities, which will only add to your stress and exacerbate your anxiety. The earlier you can get a handle on your anxiety, the better.
Healthy Ways to Cope
Keeping your health in order is one of the most important ways to help you have a handle on your anxiety. Maintain a well-balanced diet and do not skip meals and snacks. This will worsen anxiety symptoms. Also, try to avoid caffeine and alcohol. You should also ensure you’re getting adequate sleep and establish a regular bedtime and wake-up time. Anywhere from seven to eight hours a night qualifies as adequate sleep.
According to GoodTherapy.org, “Daily exercise is one of the most effective ways to reduce stress and anxiety.” Aim to exercise four or more days a week. In addition, many anxiety sufferers find relief from practicing deep breathing, meditation, or other relaxation exercises. Try to schedule rest breaks throughout the day, even if you have to set an alarm on your phone to remind you. Whether you take a short walk, meditate, practice mindful breathing, or another relaxation technique, be sure to take a few minutes several times a day for a timeout.
Find a hobby or passion and incorporate time to engage in that activity on a daily basis or as often as possible. Some people enjoy playing instruments, while others enjoy writing. A hike is therapeutic for certain individuals, and others find great joy in a game of disc golf. It doesn’t matter which interest you prefer, as long as it’s a healthy way to have fun and let loose.
Maintaining supportive relationships is an important part of successfully functioning with anxiety. Try to build loving and warm relationships with trusted individuals. This support system is an invaluable resource on your high-anxiety days and during hard times.
Dogs are good for anxiety because they provide structure and make people feel connected. They also boost your mood and reduce stress. Dogs can help you feel a sense of purpose and help you meet new people. If you don’t own a dog and don’t have the time or resources to care for one 24/7, take advantage of the sharing economy (today’s economic system in which individuals are able to share, borrow, or rent services or assets from another private individual). For example, if you’re 18 or older, you can take on dog walking as a side gig to take advantage of the health benefits of quality time with dogs while also earning extra money.
Anxiety disorder is a chronic condition, so there is no cure. It’s a lifelong disease with many ups and downs. However, living a successful and comfortable life with an anxiety disorder is possible. By maintaining a healthy lifestyle and incorporating some coping techniques, you can have better control of your symptoms.


Author: Noah Smith

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April 5, 2017

Rid of K2, and now a fantastic mom


“Amy” began using drugs as a seventh grader, and when her parents
found out, they cracked down hard. She was sent to a special school
but promptly got herself expelled and wound up back home, doing
Cinderella duties amid mounting verbal and physical abuse.

One day
she fled, and her family came after her. “I literally ran through the drag
with all my luggage,” she recalled. Thus began a year of living on the
streets. Pregnant and addicted to K2, she became a Street Youth
Ministry client.

She sought help at a local rehab program, then
managed something we’ve never seen a street youth do – she
convinced them to offer her housing in a sober facility until her baby
arrived. She is now sober, housed, a fantastic mom. She has enrolled in
a child care program with the Texas Workforce Commission and is
currently seeking a job. She attends worship with her sponsor every
week. “I’m a Pentecostal,” she said, “but I go with my Lutheran friend
and we somehow make it work.”

Amy is grateful for all the help God
has sent her way. From the storm came new life!

All our efforts on behalf of street-dependent youth really
center on this one objective: we give them hope they
need to get themselves off the streets. You can help:
Go to donate.StreetYouthMinistry.org

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February 1, 2017

2016 Highlights in Review



SYM Top Ministry Moment #10

Clients Come Inside to Enjoy Showtime

This summer was quite hot, and we had a wonderful invitation from long-time partner St. Austin’s Parish Church to use an air-conditioned fellowship room to give our clients a break. Together, we watched two movies each Friday afternoon and shared snacks and dinner together. It became one of our most popular indoor events! Clients surprised us with their movie choices, such as “Homeward Bound,” “Hairspray,” and “Daddy’s Home!”



SYM Top Ministry Moment #9

LifeWorks, SYM Strategic Agreement

In October, we learned of a new opportunity for a permanent home for SYM. We forged a much-expanded alliance with Congregational Church of Austin to utilize its basement as a new Drop-In Cooperative center, where clients can get safety net services, receive guidance counseling, and learn soft life skills for jobs and apartment living. We also expanded our partnership with LifeWorks, which will provide counseling, case management and group support in our Drop-In Center. The photo shows leaders of the three organizations. 

SYM Top Ministry Moment #8
Computer Lab and Shower Time

Our clients have always wanted access to a clean and safe shower. We were blessed to receive an invitation from University Presbyterian Church to use its fellowship hall, including shower, once a week. We equipped the room with computers so waiting clients can do other things. We also provide access to piano and guitar. Nothing like hanging out after a nice, refreshing shower! In the photo, a client and a volunteer share an interest in drawing.

SYM Top Ministry Moment #7
Darvin Receives his Work Visa

Darvin Tan started with SYM as an intern in 2015, and he discerned that his calling was to stay. However, he didn’t have a visa. We applied for a religious work visa for him and, amazingly, received very rapid approval! Darvin is key to keeping our ministry working smoothly. Darvin staffed our annual Turkey Grab, something we do for clients who have recovered from the street every year so they can serve others with a homemade meal. Darvin posed at left with turkey donors from Mothers of Professional Football Players.

SYM Top Ministry Moment #6
SYM Joins 100-Day Youth Challenge

This
year we partnered with LifeWorks and ECHO on a 100-day challenge to
house as many street-dependent youths under age 25 as possible. Our role
was to make sure clients completed the application form and 27 of our
clients from the West Campus streets did so! Each youth in the photo and
many others were placed into apartments. If they meet the criteria and
become able to pay rent, they will be able to remain there!

SYM Top Ministry Moment #5
LifeWorks/SYM Halloween Party

This
year, LifeWorks, SYM and University Presbyterian Church combined forces
to throw an awesome Halloween party for our clients, complete with
costumes, face painting, treats, grilled burgers and hot dogs, and a
raffle. We were joined by UT student athletes from many sports. They
painted faces, played Jenga and other games, and drew prizes for our
raffle. In the photo, a client challenges a UT student to a game of bean
bag toss.
    
                                   

SYM Top Ministry Moment #4
Matt and Jared, Super Interns

We
were blessed to have two summer interns this year! Jared Dale and
Matthew Powell were our high school interns. They learned to interact
safely with clients, operate our many events, and master the fine art of
logistics!

Read about our internships and pass the word to mature high school juniors. Our weekly stipend is not a lot, but it’s enough to keep one from needing a second job.  


SYM Top Ministry Moment #3
A Safer Arrival for Babies

Deon,
above, holds one of our newest SYM clients. Her mother got off the
street quickly once she learned she was pregnant. When we became aware
of high miscarriage and infant death rates among our pregnant clients,
we focused on the problem. We raised awareness. We asked them to count
the number of months they spent on the street, and work to reduce that
number. Several of our clients moved back home, got jobs, and found
prenatal care. When their babies arrived, there was room and love for
them!

‘Giving … an easy way to help’
“Giving
financially to SYM is an easy way to help, since I am not close enough
to volunteer. They help these youths go to college with textbook
scholarships, celebrate accomplishments like staying off alcohol and
drugs. I am impressed with SYM, its volunteers and the street youth
themselves for what they are doing.”

— A donor, posted on-line at GreatNon-profits.org 

SYM Top Ministry Moment #2

A Christmas to Celebrate


Our
end-of-year celebration of Christmas was fabulous. Forty-one clients
and 30 volunteers — including the happy kitchen crew above — gathered
to celebrate the coming of Jesus. We were hosted by the Daughters of the
King from All Saints Episcopal Church. We celebrated a lot of amazing
accomplishments by our clients, including moving into apartments, having
healthy babies, getting jobs, being sober, going to college and more!


‘… a labor of love and faith …’

“We
have been involved with Street Youth Ministry for several years, making
sandwiches, and clothing donations and have been watching the
dedication that Terry Cole has for the street youth. We get regular
newsletters and emails and prayer requests that are evidence of the
great labor of love and faith that defines this organization.”

— Posted on GreatNonprofits.com


SYM Top Ministry Moment #1

‘Second Chance’ Prom

We
team up with LifeWorks to offer a Second Chance Prom each year to all
our clients. This is so inspirational for them! They get dressed up,
pose for portraits taken by a professional photographer (as above), are
treated like prom royalty, and walk taller and prouder for weeks
afterwards. Your assistance is pivotal!


‘He’s everywhere, all the time…’
“You
don’t really find him — Terry has a way of finding you. We move
around, but no matter where we go Terry finds us and talks to us. He is
just this guy walking his dog, like you would see anyone, but then he
stops and talks to you and tells you there are ways to get off the
street. Even if you don’t believe him at first, he is everywhere, all
the time, so you can’t help but wonder what’s up.”
— Client, as told to a volunteer

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