Posts tagged ‘client solution’

May 8, 2020

Adapting to the virus!


Our “Drop-by team” handed out supplies, food and clothing through the gates in front of the Drop-in Center as we met clients — keeping a safe distance — after coronavirus restrictions were put in force. The offerings included a pizza party, above and at right!

via Blogger https://ift.tt/2YLyP27

December 3, 2019

Christmas for SYM Clients


Merry Christmas!

   As the time to share that greeting rolls around each year, I think of the 3,000+ clients our ministry has served since we began in 2008. What kind of Christmases will they have?
   Thanks especially to social media these days, we know more of the answers. Some clients have excelled, and they’ve written us. A few lives ended tragically. Other clients intrigue us – they surface periodically to say “thanks” or share news, infusing us like the episodes of an old-fashioned serial, complete with cliffhanger endings.

   Such a continuing story this year was shared by a client whose street name was “Powder”:

   2012-13, off and on – Powder attended a few of our events back before we had our Drop-in Co-op, and he came to the 2013 Christmas party at All Saints Episcopal. He was using drugs at the time, and he ran around with friends using street names like Merce, Grinch and Bean.
   We hadn’t seen Powder since 2013, then he resurfaced three years later with a Facebook message:
   1 a.m., June 16, 2016 – “You probably won’t remember me. I hung around for a little while in 2012-2013.  I remember speaking to you multiple times at the Drop-in. I don’t know how many success stories you hear, but I just wanted to let you know that I haven’t done dope in 2 1/2 years and I just bought my own house in a suburb of Kansas City.”
   I checked into his records and finally ran into an old photo that summoned memories. What I didn’t know was how deeply we had changed the direction of this young man’s journey. Powder and I had the following Facebook exchange, edited for space:
   Terry: “Well congratulations on all that! … I always love hearing from people who are doing well. You’d be surprised (or maybe you wouldn’t) to know that it’s a whole lot of people!
   Powder: “I was pretty nondescript and tried my best not to be noticed.  If you don’t remember me that doesn’t hurt my feelings, I remember you and the rest of the staff and how much the simple things y’all did for me helped. It made me feel like an actual person.”
   Terry: “I know your face. I don’t yet recall your street name Powder. I’m really glad we were able to love on you a bit and that it helped. What made you decide to retire and get sober and all that?
   Powder: “I just got tired of living that way. I went to jail for a few months, then a psych ward, and then a rehab program. After that I just decided I wasn’t going to go back and live that way again, so I got into a halfway house and got a job and all that.”
   Terry: “Cool. I’m glad. I assume it’s better for you? Doesn’t have to be, but is faith a resource for you at this point?
   Powder: “I struggle with faith and spirituality. I have had a lot of things happen, seen things and whatnot, but it just doesn’t seem to “click.” I haven’t had the spiritual awakening or whatever you want to call it.”
   Terry: “I’d say be patient with yourself and stay in touch with that part of you that knows or wants there to be something bigger than us. It doesn’t hurt to hang around people who are further along than you are, but not to let them tell you what to think. Just to learn and see and feel how it is for them. I’ll be praying for you in that regard. Any other way I can be praying for you? Also, could I use your words to encourage others? I wouldn’t use your name unless you want me to. Recovery is a long road and it’s great for those who feel like it may never happen to them to hear from people like you who were around quite a while but are recovering!”
   Powder: “Yeah sure, I appreciate all your help, past and present.”
   Fast forward three years, four months. I heard from him again:
   11:08 p.m., Oct. 5, 2019 — “Touching base again, Terry. I just want to say again how helpful the Drop-in was to me at a time when I needed it the most. I’m still sober, haven’t touched drugs or booze since January 10, 2014. I’m still bouncing around, but I’m in much better condition than I was back then, physically and spiritually.
   “I have a skilled trade. I’m a butcher. I work full-time and I can’t help but feel like I’ve left that world behind. It’s for the best, but some of the happiest moments of my life happened on the Drag. I’ve noticed that it’s almost like a class graduating: people I knew ended up dead, in prison or clean, and a new generation came to replace our spots.
   “Now I’m sitting on the couch in a home that I ‘own’ and watching cable. I’m not in Missouri anymore. but that’s where I learned to butcher, in a family-owned shop that was looking for some help during deer season. I managed to leverage that into a union full-time job at a grocery store. I’ve tried to settle down a couple times and it just hasn’t worked out. I think I just enjoy being a rambler.
   “I’m still not sure where I stand on my beliefs. I go back and forth a lot. I’d like to settle down somewhere, That’s the big one. I want to continue this trend of “living a normal life” without being too boring. Maybe I just need to find a hobby. I’ll get back in touch with you again when I think about it.
   Terry: “How old are you now?”
   Powder: “I’m headed toward 27, I was 19-20 in Austin.”
   Terry: “You’re right on track. I find a lot of people who hit the road for whatever reason start settling things at about 26 or so.”
   Powder: “That’s nice to hear, honestly. I had a lot of people ask me when I was in high school  and “full of potential” what I wanted to do with my life, and when I would say “ I don’t know,” I’d get the same long and boring lecture about needing to do something important.
   “I wish someone would’ve told me, or I would have known that it’s totally OK to make $35,000 a year cutting meat and going fishing every day before work. I’m never gonna have a lot of anything, but I have enough of the stuff I want and a plan for the immediate future, which is to move someplace that has trout and moving water so I can learn how to fly fish.
   “I just wish I could’ve started on this path five years ago and not be struggling toward it now. I suppose you know what they say about wishing in one hand and doing something in the other. I just have to remember I’m not that old yet, and there’s still time. Pleasure to have met you, Terry.”

Read on… for the follow up story of Powder

https://streetyouth.blogspot.com/2019/12/defining-our-life-purpose.html  

via Blogger https://ift.tt/34I46mt

December 2, 2019

Defining our life purpose


0
0
1
226
1292
Vessential
10
3
1515
14.0

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
JA
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:107%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

   Toward the end of
my “conversation” with Powder, I saw words that concerned me yet left me with
hope. He’s still “struggling,” he said, but “I’m still not that old yet, and
there’s still time.” In my final reply, I sought to leave some thoughts that
would carry him over to the next time we connected, or beyond. Here’s what I
wrote:
   “If I had heard
you say that “you don’t know” when you’re 18 or 19, I would’ve responded,
‘That’s OK. You’re not supposed to know yet.’ I think your life has purpose,
but that purpose is probably not defined by what you do to earn money or to
relax.

   “I think that
purpose is probably defined by the relationships you have in your life and what
you do with them: being kind, being patient, seeking peace, instilling hope,
loving others, etc. And I bet you still don’t know all the answers to that
question — and it’s still OK. I’m sorry for the angst and more along your
path, but I don’t even know that you started out on the wrong path. It led to
here, and it leads into the future. So perhaps it was the right one all along.”
   We likely have
this type of impact on our clients with our guidance counseling every day and
don’t yet know it. Our journeys in life are filled with people who matter to us
and people to whom we matter. Sometimes we don’t even know it. This Advent and
Christmas, enjoy the journey and enjoy the people around you. You never know
who you will be making a difference to!
   Thank you for
supporting SYM and being a part of making a difference!

via Blogger https://ift.tt/2rRtQi0

December 2, 2019

Christmas for SYM Clients


0
0
1
930
5301
Vessential
44
12
6219
14.0

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
JA
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:107%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

Merry Christmas!

   As the time to
share that greeting rolls around each year, I think of the 3,000+ clients our
ministry has served since we began in 2008. What kind of Christmases will they
have?
   Thanks especially
to social media these days, we know more of the answers. Some clients have
excelled, and they’ve written us. A few lives ended tragically. Other clients
intrigue us – they surface periodically to say “thanks” or share news, infusing
us like the episodes of an old-fashioned serial, complete with cliffhanger
endings.

   Such a continuing
story this year was shared by a client whose street name was “Powder”:

   2012-13, off and
on
– Powder attended a few of our events
back before we had our Drop-in Co-op, and he came to the 2013 Christmas party
at All Saints Episcopal. He was using drugs at the time, and he ran around with
friends using street names like Merce, Grinch and Bean.
   We hadn’t seen
Powder since 2013, then he resurfaced three years later with a Facebook
message:
   1 a.m., June 16,
2016
– “You probably won’t remember me. I
hung around for a little while in 2012-2013.  I remember speaking to you
multiple times at the Drop-in. I don’t know how many success stories you hear,
but I just wanted to let you know that I haven’t done dope in 2 1/2 years and I
just bought my own house in a suburb of Kansas City.”
   I checked into his
records and finally ran into an old photo that summoned memories. What I didn’t
know was how deeply we had changed the direction of this young man’s journey.
Powder and I had the following Facebook exchange, edited for space:
   Terry: “Well congratulations on all that! … I always love
hearing from people who are doing well. You’d be surprised (or maybe you
wouldn’t) to know that it’s a whole lot of people!
   Powder: “I was pretty nondescript and tried my best not to be
noticed.  If you don’t remember me that doesn’t hurt my feelings, I
remember you and the rest of the staff and how much the simple things y’all did
for me helped. It made me feel like an actual person.”
   Terry: “I know your face. I don’t yet recall your street name
Powder. I’m really glad we were able to love on you a bit and that it helped.
What made you decide to retire and get sober and all that?
   Powder: “I just got tired of living that way. I went to jail for
a few months, then a psych ward, and then a rehab program. After that I just
decided I wasn’t going to go back and live that way again, so I got into a
halfway house and got a job and all that.”
   Terry: “Cool. I’m glad. I assume it’s better for you? Doesn’t
have to be, but is faith a resource for you at this point?
   Powder: “I struggle with faith and spirituality. I have had a lot
of things happen, seen things and whatnot, but it just doesn’t seem to
“click.” I haven’t had the spiritual awakening or whatever you want
to call it.”
   Terry: “I’d say be patient with yourself and stay in touch with
that part of you that knows or wants there to be something bigger than us. It
doesn’t hurt to hang around people who are further along than you are, but not
to let them tell you what to think. Just to learn and see and feel how it is
for them. I’ll be praying for you in that regard. Any other way I can be
praying for you? Also, could I use your words to encourage others? I wouldn’t
use your name unless you want me to. Recovery is a long road and it’s great for
those who feel like it may never happen to them to hear from people like you
who were around quite a while but are recovering!”
   Powder: “Yeah sure, I appreciate all your help, past and
present.”
   Fast forward three
years, four months. I heard from him again:
   11:08 p.m., Oct.
5, 2019
— “Touching base again, Terry. I just
want to say again how helpful the Drop-in was to me at a time when I needed it
the most. I’m still sober, haven’t touched drugs or booze since January 10,
2014. I’m still bouncing around, but I’m in much better condition than I was
back then, physically and spiritually.
   “I have a skilled
trade. I’m a butcher. I work full-time and I can’t help but feel like I’ve left
that world behind. It’s for the best, but some of the happiest moments of my
life happened on the Drag. I’ve noticed that it’s almost like a class
graduating: people I knew ended up dead, in prison or clean, and a new
generation came to replace our spots.
   “Now I’m sitting
on the couch in a home that I ‘own’ and watching cable. I’m not in Missouri
anymore. but that’s where I learned to butcher, in a family-owned shop that was
looking for some help during deer season. I managed to leverage that into a
union full-time job at a grocery store. I’ve tried to settle down a couple
times and it just hasn’t worked out. I think I just enjoy being a rambler.
   “I’m still not
sure where I stand on my beliefs. I go back and forth a lot. I’d like to settle
down somewhere, That’s the big one. I want to continue this trend of “living a
normal life” without being too boring. Maybe I just need to find a hobby. I’ll
get back in touch with you again when I think about it.
   Terry: “How old are you now?”
   Powder: “I’m headed toward 27, I was 19-20 in Austin.”
   Terry: “You’re right on track. I find a lot of people who hit
the road for whatever reason start settling things at about 26 or so.”
   Powder: “That’s nice to hear, honestly. I had a lot of people ask
me when I was in high school  and “full of potential” what I wanted to do
with my life, and when I would say “ I don’t know,” I’d get the same long and boring
lecture about needing to do something important.
   “I wish someone
would’ve told me, or I would have known that it’s totally OK to make $35,000 a
year cutting meat and going fishing every day before work. I’m never gonna have
a lot of anything, but I have enough of the stuff I want and a plan for the
immediate future, which is to move someplace that has trout and moving water so
I can learn how to fly fish.
   “I just wish I
could’ve started on this path five years ago and not be struggling toward it
now. I suppose you know what they say about wishing in one hand and doing
something in the other. I just have to remember I’m not that old yet, and
there’s still time. Pleasure to have met you, Terry.”

via Blogger https://ift.tt/2r9RpCp

July 17, 2019

Clients Need More than Housing


0
0
1
626
3574
Vessential
29
8
4192
14.0

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
JA
X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:107%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

   “We don’t
just need housing,” a client named Curtis told me recently. “We need help
learning how to live in housing.” He was frustrated, but he’s part
of a voice of change in Austin.




 Street Youth
Ministry is trusted, and we inspire our clients. We empower them to make change
— we don’t make it for them. We are an evolving ministry, always looking to
keep things fresh. Being fresh helps attract people to us, but there’s more to
needing to be fresh than that. The landscape and the needs are always changing.
One must listen intently and inquire directly to learn what clients are
coping with and what they need now
. And you must pay attention to the
environment in which they are homeless and seeking help: other agencies, local
and federal agencies, relevant social problems and pressures.


   Curtis was
referring to a new HUD initiative (administered by ECHO with
federal funding) that has provided many clients with free housing for a period
of time. I know its origins well, because helped write the program definition that
got HUD approval and brought the $5.5 million initiative to life. HUD pays only
for housing, so we receive none of the funding and we are not able to be part
of the oversight. However, we refer lots of interested clients into the program
and continue to work with them afterwards.

Curtis was
voicing concern that people who are taken from the streets and placed in
apartments, even free ones, lose their community. They can become depressed and
isolated. In addition, we see clients with stress and anxiety from housing
responsibilities that can seem almost unsurmountable. Many invite their
friends over to re-establish that community, but this can lead to eviction.
Depressed
and isolated people have a hard time with motivation to find and keep jobs—a
new experience for many–so they are often unemployed.  Overall they don’t feel competent at life.


SYM has
adapted to this changing environment by listening to our clients
. We asked
how can we help. Some want one-on-one budgeting help. Some want employment
guidance. We spend considerable time in guidance counseling these days with
people who have housing but aren’t sure what is next. In addition, we help with
groceries once a week (see story next page). And we provide cleaning supplies
once a month. All this allows us to maintain our relationship, even
though the clients perhaps don’t come to our Drop-in Center as often, because
they have an apartment
.

   We have added several
events and activities with a goal of creating a feeling of competency within
our clients: art group, game night and talent night. They can volunteering at
SYM to earn credits so they can purchase nice donated items from our “store.”
(We’ve found this to be a great way to also re-engage clients in a personal
economy and teach deferred gratification.) They can earn participate in our online
learning programs and earn credit for merchandise on Amazon. (This teaches them
the process of saving for larger items and planning purchases.) We have several
events that are great for lonely clients who might need a community: peer
support group, movie night, or game night.

  

Curtis is a
good example of our guidance counseling at work
. He first received
services almost daily about 18 months ago. Then he stopped coming and began
pursuing jobs in security. He got an apartment under the HUD program, pays his
bills and buys his groceries. Recently, he started coming back to us on
occasion for community and guidance. He shared that he doesn’t want to work in
security. It’s just what he found. He wants to start a camp for
disadvantaged children, but he doesn’t really know where to start.


   Curtis has become
our next client intern for entrepreneurship. He will work in our Drop-in like
any intern, but we will also spend time with him teaching him about donors,
volunteers, in-kind giving, program management and so on. We hope that by the
end of the internship he will know if education or more practical experience is
the next step in pursuing his dream!



   Thank you for being a part of all the guidance
counseling and practical help we supply to our street youth clients! It
matters! It works!
  
Terry

via Blogger https://ift.tt/2XO4jW5

July 2, 2019

New Community Engagement Person


Meet Tondra, SYM’s new Outside
Community Engagement Person

We have an exciting announcement to share. A young woman whose face is familiar to clients and volunteers is transitioning from a client entrepreneur internship to the position of outside community engagement person.

She is Tondra Daily, a former client who is taking increasingly responsible roles at Street Youth Ministry. “Her new job is to build new relationships,” Terry explained, “so if people have never volunteered, Tondra is here to help make it easy for them. She’s also building new relationships to churches and businesses. There has never been a better time to engage with SYM!”

“I’m very excited,” Tondra said. “I’m really loving my new role. I like people and am a social butterfly, so it’s a huge blessing that I actually get PAID to get to go out into the community and talk to people about what I love: Street Youth Ministry! I DO love the ministry and know it from the inside out in a very personal way, and I feel uniquely equipped to do this. I myself was a homeless client years ago! I have since given my life to Jesus and discovered who I am in Him.”

via Blogger https://ift.tt/2J7pXeZ

July 1, 2019

Our clients just love Art Group!


Our clients just love Art Group!
Twice each week, clients gather for one of our most
 popular events — Art Group.
 Clients do arts or crafts projects after lunch,
and volunteers help out with the crafts or in
 the thrift store or the kitchen.

via Blogger https://ift.tt/2FLk050

April 22, 2019

Fun at SYM


Game night fun!
Since it was started two years ago, Game Night has been a big hit with clients and volunteers alike.
Breakfast taco troupe
Volunteers from Shepherd of the Hills Presbyterian Church thoroughly enjoy themselves as they make food for our freezer.

via Blogger http://bit.ly/2GAfEyz

April 22, 2019

Fun at SYM


Game night fun!
Since it was started two years ago, Game Night has been a big hit with clients and volunteers alike.
Breakfast taco troupe
Volunteers from Shepherd of the Hills Presbyterian Church thoroughly enjoy themselves as they make food for our freezer.

via Blogger http://bit.ly/2GAfEyz

April 22, 2019

Fun at SYM


Game night fun!
Since it was started two years ago, Game Night has been a big hit with clients and volunteers alike.
Breakfast taco troupe
Volunteers from Shepherd of the Hills Presbyterian Church thoroughly enjoy themselves as they make food for our freezer.

via Blogger http://bit.ly/2GAfEyz